CAN YOU LIVE IN GERMANY WITHOUT SPEAKING GERMAN? #Germany #travel





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17 Comments

  1. You can check out Speakly here: https://speakly.app.link/Speakly and use one of the codes in the description box to save money on a premium membership!

    Do you think speaking German in Germany is necessary? Today you find out some of the reasons why I think learning German is important for a "fun" life in Germany.

  2. My husband's friend married a woman that didn't speak an ounce of Swiss German. She speaks French and Farsi. The man and woman would speak a very broken English to each other. Since I came into my husband's life the wife and I became friends their English has improved a lot. I wanted to speak German with the husband, but he wouldnt let me. He wanted to learn English. I really do believe that you should make an effort to speak the language of the country you're living in. Germans and small town Swiss are good about being patient with your German. I only say small Swiss towns because in the big city people hear my English accent and switch to English. It really pisses me off. The small towns usually do speak English, but they arent so rush, rush, rush. Really sometimes they will sit down and help you learn German (if they have the time). In Germany I relied on English or Spanish a little to much and I'm disappointed in myself for that.
    I have to go with Englush/Latin/Greek with doctors and governmental institutions. English speakers use Latin and Greek words for medicine. Also I had the knowledge of the English medical terminology from being in the medical field in the US. I just don't understand the German medical terminology.

  3. In rural areas with their small villages it will be extremly difficult to live there without knowing at least basics of the domestic language because that will be then a very lonely and outcasted experience when not…just saying.
    While in cities it is very possible because those cities are cosmopolitan…at least for those who already prepared their move decently in already having a regular income/job in Germany before they move to Germany then you can connect with those english speaking co workers living in an "english bubble" so to say…but the amount of english speaking jobs is very negligible..just saying.

  4. Depending on where in Germany you are you can get by with English or the main language of the closest neighboring country. Since most Germans haven't had much exposure beyond their school curriculum they've probably forgotten most of the English they learned ages ago. On the other hand you can get pretty far even with a very limited vocabulary and supporting gestures, while still learning the basics.

  5. Having been raised multi lingual I'll never understand why people are unwilling to invest in learning another language when moving to another country (even for the shortest time)
    [I've tried to pick up as much (foreign) language as possible even on vacation(s)]

  6. If you like to work and life in Germany it would be nice to know a few words in German before you start here.
    In bigger cities like Munich, Hamburg, Frankfurt or Berlin you can survive without the German language, but i don't know if it's so much fun at all.
    Without you will find other people, but they are not always Germans and Germans in bigger groups will automatically talk in German and if you don't know what happens,
    you are sitting on the site.
    It can be interesting at the beginning even for Germans, they can use their skills, but after a few months it can be more complicated.
    So trying to learn the language is something i totally appreciate.
    I did it before I went to Ireland and even their i had two times a week a course in the evening to improve my skills.
    That course was a good opportunity to get in contact to other people.

  7. You definately can. Most people speak at least basic English. If you live in bigger cities or here to study, everyone is used to communicate with foreigners or tourists.
    But if you stay longer
    you should definately try to pick up a bit of the native language. Learning languages is fun and you grow as a person. Also you will never fully connect to local people if you don't put in the efford to learn their language.

  8. The first foreign language we're learning here is english. These days also in Kindergarten. Normally it shouldn't be a problem to manage your life here in english.

  9. To reply to the Headline question : yes you can .. but you should not. (also commenting before having watched the entire video always is an amazing idea)

    edit: … so elaborate (which is kind of important for that topic)

    – you can when you are an Erasmus student and living mainly on campus in one of the larger cities in Germany (in my case Hamburg) – which are both, university cities AND more international.
    – you can if you do not care too much for learning too much about Germany – that is … doing more than "book learning"
    – what Hayley said .. you can if you dont mind to be a hypocrite of sorts. Personally, i want migrants to learn my countries language here (which is also an asylum requirement anyway) – so when i was a migrant in Germany (even if is on an Erasmus student program) – it is just good manners to learn German.

    or to say it in German. Du kannst sprechen Englisch oder einen anderen Sprache und mehr oder weniger keine Problemen haben. Aber du triffst auf viel mehr Freuden wenn du es versuchst, auch wenn es nicht sehr gut ist.

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