#Argentina #travel Look at impact of Chile eruption on environment, tourism industry




SHOTLIST
++AUDIO QUALITY AS INCOMING++
Nahuel Huapi Lake
1. Wide of lake, stream in foreground darkened with volcanic ash, banks of lake also covered with ash from Chile’s Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcano
2. Wide of lake with water half blue and half brown from volcanic ash
3. Close up of ash covering lake surface
4. Stream darkened by ash
5. Birds drinking water from stream
6. Various of cows and sheep
San Carlos de Bariloche
7. Road leading to Bariloche covered with volcanic ash, clouds of ash in background
8. Wide of Bariloche city centre covered with ash
9. Vehicles passing by
10. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Marcelo Cascon, Mayor of San Carlos de Bariloche:
“Tourism represents the main source of income for the town, the airport is shut and that means great difficulties for our town, because tourists arrive here mainly by air and they are the key sector for the season.”
11. International airport shut down, covered with ash
12. Airport parking lot, cloud of volcanic ash in the air
13. Various of sky resort closed because of ash
La Angostura
14. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Roberto Alonso, Mayor of La Angostura:
“We can’t evaluate today how the season’s final results are going to be but we can say that this has spoiled the beginning of the winter season that is starting these days.”
15. Various of neighbours cleaning rooftop and entrance to hotel
16. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Alejandro Curiluck, business owner:
“Among all the residents we are working hard and cleaning up everything, I’d say that in 15 days we will be operational, the great problem is that the volcano must stop spewing ashes.”
17. Various of army cleaning up volcanic ash
18. Speed sign covered with ash
19. Tree leaves covered with ash
20. Army “cleaning point”
STORYLINE
Ash from Chile’s Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcano is affecting the start of the ski season for some of Argentina’s main winter holiday resorts and endangering cattle and wildlife alike.
The closest major city to the volcano is San Carlos de Bariloche, just over the border in Argentina, where thick abrasive soot coated the streets.
The ash covered ski slopes above the city two weeks before the official start of the winter skiing season.
The resorts’ trade group said it was too early to say how it would affect the local economy, but for now, residents were told to stay indoors and tourists were asked not to come.
Volcanic dust also settled on the surface of Lake Nahuel Huapi, close to the Villa la Angostura – another ski resort and a town that has been heavily affected by the ash.
According to local media, only a handful of families have evacuated the town.
The rest have remained to help, working in turns to clean up the ash that has clogged water pipes and damaged down electricity pylons.
Lakes, rivers and streams in the Argentinean Patagonia are all partially covered with a thick layer of ash, polluting the water.
In neighbouring Chile, thousands of salmon have died in rivers and fish farms polluted by the volcanic ash. Residents in the area surrounding Lake Nahuel Huapi now fear the same might occur in their country.
Cattle are also in peril with vast fields covered with ash and farmers struggling to provide fresh water for the hundreds of thousands of cows and sheep in the area.
The main international airports in Argentina and Uruguay, which have intermittently opened and closed since the volcano started spewing ash, were closed again on Thursday.
Hundreds of passengers were stuck in terminals as flights remained grounded at Buenos Aires’ main airports.

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